We should always be free to ask questions

A recent post at the Friendly Atheist mentions what looks like an interesting book.  Christian blogger Anne Jackson asked readers to respond to the question, “What is one thing you feel you can’t say in church?” She published the responses in book form, and the excerpts over at the Friendly Atheist seem to confirm what many people already know – there are some questions it’s not okay to ask in church. For example:

My brother is gay and a Christian. I don’t feel that I can talk about it in church.
-Andy

If homosexuality is a moral wrong, as many Christians will claim, it should not be difficult to explain why. And yet, Andy apparently doesn’t feel comfortable asking for that explanation in his church. Could it be that questions on such matters are not welcomed?

We should always be free to ask questions. Life is a search for knowledge – to be able to conduct that search honestly is a basic human right.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Books, Freethought, Human Rights, Religion

2 responses to “We should always be free to ask questions

  1. anneris31

    Having just spent a year at a Christian college, I can relate. Regardless of how much these organizations encourage honesty and openness, their reactions to uncomfortable issues like homosexuality or the issue of “whose going to hell” convey a completely different message. I know that when I asked questions such as “what about the fates of people who’ve never heard about Jesus?” or “If all humans are sinful and deserve negative experiences, how do you explain an 8 year old child dying of cancer?” I recieved mostly uncomfortable responses and a quick change of subject. In many Christian environments, just like many other religious or political environments, the preference to most is to just talk about how much you agree with each other and avoid all other topics. Its really sad that in an age of contradictory thoughts and new ideas that we aren’t encouraged to be open about those ideas.

  2. One of the reasons (indeed the main reason) I left the church when I did was that they didn’t like me asking so many questions. Also they would never give me a straight answer.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s